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What’s the deal with fats, oils, and grease?

When cooking waste like fats, oils, and grease (FOG) go down the drain, it damages and clogs pipes. These clogged pipes cause sewer overflows which introduce harmful bacteria into Galveston Bay and the environment. You can protect your pipes and the Bay by throwing leftover kitchen grease in the trash and recycling your used cooking oil at an approved location.

Game developed by Taylor Harris, Victor Martinez, and Chance Eckert. Music by Rodrigo Gonzalez-Torres.

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Christmas dinner fatbergs raise flood risk, say water companies

Christmas dinner with all the trimmings could lead to congealed cooking oil and grease blocking drains up and down the country, water companies have warned. Engineers from Severn Trent Water have been digging tons of fatty gunk, which sets as hard as concrete, out of sewers in the West Midlands after reports of flooding caused […]

Cease the Grease to Protect Our Bay!

When fats, oils, and greases (FOG) go down the drain at home, they stick to pipes and harden to create blockages. Clogged and damaged pipes can lead to sewer overflows, where raw sewage can back up into your home, lawn, neighborhood, streets, and storm drains. This mess presents hazards not only to human health, but […]

Meet Hector, the latest weapon in the battle against fatbergs

A former police dog will be swapping a life of crime for a life of grime, after being picked to detect sewer blocking ‘fat bergs’. Hector, a nine-stone bloodhound, has been trained to detect fatty blockages on Southern Water’s 25,000 mile sewer network by sniffing air gaps present at ground level.

The Problem With FOG

Once poured down the kitchen sink, fats, oils, and grease (FOG) condense and clog pipes and sewer lines below our feet.

Recycle Used Cooking Oil Here

Our Sponsors

This project is funded in part by a Texas Coastal Management Program Grant approved by the Texas Land Commissioner pursuant to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Award No. NA15NOS4190162

This project has been funded in part by the United States Environmental Protection Agency under assistance agreement Contract No. 582-14-43075 to Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.